Wednesday, December 24, 2008

Monday, December 15, 2008

Trapped moth

Photo of a trapped and ragged common moth dangling on a spider web thread.


Going to be a spider's meal.

Monday, December 8, 2008

Red cyan tropical damselfly - Series #2

Photo of a tiny red cyan tropical Damselfly. If I'm not mistaken, the Damselfly species is probably a Ceriagrion Cerinorubellum.


Click image for larger display.

Related posts:
* Tropical Pond Damselfly (Enallagma civile)


Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Tropical cream butterfly - Series #8

Photos of tropical butterfly from either the Pieridae or Riodinidae family. Exact genus is unknown. The butterfly species is cream in colour with occasional orange patches and a few pansy eyes.

The striking element of this butterfly is it's thorax and abdomen which has black horizontal stripes.


Closer shot of a tropical butterfly.


How tropical butterfly look from far.

Related posts:
* Tropical butterfly - Ptychandra Lorquini
* Tropical Butterfly - Orange butterfly
* Black butterfly, Yellow Ixora
* Tropical Butterfly - Junonia Orithya Madagascariensis - Eyed Pansy - Blue Pansy
* Tropical Moths and Butterflies, Series #3
* Moths and Butterflies, Series #2

Monday, November 24, 2008

Kota Kinabalu waterfront scene

A sea view from the Marina Court Apartment. Nice view, nice rental. Back to the photo, a lone yacht anchoring at Likas Bay (Kota Kinabalu waterfront). At the background is the Kampung Air (or water village) at Pulau Gaya.


Click photo for enlarge image.

If you view the large size image, you will actually see the yacht installed with solar panels. I guessed they need the power for night lighting.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Wasp spider of Borneo - Argiope bruennichi

Take a look at the photos below of Wasp spider. The yellow, black and white spider is also known as Argiope bruennichi. The Wasp spider is also similar to Saint Andrews Cross spider (sp. Argiope keyserlingii).

I know spider has unique set of eyes but I just couldn't get closer to really have zero macro shoot of the eyes. Spider bites, so I avoid the risk.


Striking pose


Close shot of wasp spider


From far: the green pouch above the spider is it's egg sac

Related posts:
* Common Huntsman Spider - Series #2
* Tropical spider - Series #1

About Wasp spider |

Argiope bruennichi, or the wasp spider, is a species of orb-web spider distributed throughout central Europe, Northern Europe, north Africa and parts of Asia. Like many other members of the genus Argiope, (including St Andrew's Cross spiders), it shows striking yellow and black markings on its abdomen.

The spider builds a spiral orb web at dawn or dusk, commonly in long grass a little above ground level, taking it approximately an hour. The prominent zigzag shape called the stabilimentum, or web decoration, featured at the centre of the orb is of uncertain function, though it may be to attract insects.

When a prey item is first caught in the web, Argiope bruennichi will quickly immobilise its prey by wrapping it in silk. The prey is then bitten and then injected with a paralysing venom and a protein dissolving enzyme.

The male of the species is much smaller than the female. It can often be seen in or near a female's web waiting for her to complete her final moult, at which time she reaches sexual maturity. At this time and her chelicerae (jaws) will be soft for a short time and the male may mate with the female without the danger of being eaten.

During Summer 2006, research was carried out in the UK to find that there has been an influx of these spiders to the UK. The colour is still similar, although the yellow stripes are a bit more cream coloured.

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Tropical Giant Locust, Series #3

This is the third series on tropical locust. It's a giant black and brown locust measuring over six inches from tip of its feelers to tip of its tail.

The photo subject was captured at Kinabalu Pine Resort, Kundasang, Sabah.


Giant locust #1


Giant locust #2

Related posts:
* Tropical locust - Series #1
* Tropical Giant Locust, Series #2

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Tropical Giant Locust, Series #2

This is the second series on tropical locust, but not just locust, it's a giant locust measuring over six inches from tip of its feelers to tip of its tail.

It's take me two attempts to photograph this locust (which happen to linger at my backyard). My first attempt to photograph failed when it flew away on my first shot.


Macro shot of a giant locust, #1 - Overall shot.


Close up shot of a giant locust, #2 - Shoulder shot.


Zero macro shot on a giant locust, #3 - Head shot.

Related posts:
* Tropical locust - Series #1

Sunday, November 9, 2008

Tropical locust

Close up shot of a green locust with black top. The locust is green because it is in tropical Borneo. In other places, it would be brownish (desert locust). And yes, tropical locust doesn't ravage crops (swarming of crops) like in Africa or Europe because over here, we have plenty of leaves.

Locust belong to the insect family Acrididae.


Tropical locust

See also the World's best photos of Locust

Friday, November 7, 2008

Moth on a rambutan fruit, Series #6

Macro photos of a moth on a rambutan fruit. May not be the best shot BUT it the only best shot I have because, the rambutan fruit swayed due to a gentle breeze. And after the second shot, the moth flew away.

Enjoy looking at the rambutan tentacles (the hairs).



For more bigger and high-resolution photos, check out my gallery of Butterflies and Moths.

Related posts:
* Moths and Butterflies, Series #1
* Moths and Butterflies, Series #2
*Yellow moth with black stripes - Series #3
* Wild sex - Mating moths photo - Series #4
* Moth on a Ginger Flower - Series #5

Thursday, November 6, 2008

Monday, October 27, 2008

Rambutan - Nephelium lappaceum

The rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) is a medium-sized tropical tree in the family Sapindaceae, and the fruit of this tree. It is probably native to Southeast Asia (including Borneo), although its precise natural distribution is unknown. It is closely related to several other edible tropical fruits including the Lychee, Longan and Mamoncillo. Rambutan in Indonesian or Malay literally means hairy or hairy fruit caused by the 'hair' that covers this fruit. In Panama, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua, it is known as mamón chino.


Macro shot of Rambutan hairs


Closeup shot of Rambutan hairs


A ripening Rambutan fruit


Rambutan fruit bunch, how it look from far.

Sunday, October 26, 2008

Wild sex - Mating orange bugs

Another photo series on wild sex (or insect pornography). These are photo of leave bugs caught on my camera having their private moments.

Borneo bugs mate every time and you just need to have a closer look at those little leaves in the bushes or dead leaves on the jungle floor and you will find them locking together. Spotting them can be difficult at times due to their camouflage colour which is similar with their surrounding.

The photo below however presents a contrasting background with the mating bugs having a bright color of red head, orangery body and wings and with black spots/mark, black belly with white stripes.


Mating bugs on a hibiscus leave, take #1


Mating bugs on a hibiscus leave, take #2


Mating bugs on a hibiscus leave, take #3

Related insect-porn posts:
* Wild Sex - Leave Beetle Mating
* Wild Sex - Photo Of Mating Green Bugs
* Wild sex - Mating moths photo
* Wild weevil sex
* Green tropical bugs mating
* Housefly Sex, Series #2
* Adventure of two flies (Fi and Fo)

Sunday, October 19, 2008

Giant Asia millipede - Archispirostreptus gigas

Archispirostreptus gigas, the giant African millipede, is one of the largest of the millipedes, growing up to 11 in (28 cm) in length. It lives in tropical and subtropical Africa, in rotting plant life or moist earth, and usually avoids light. It is black in colour, and is often kept as a pet (would you?).

Asia giant millipede with hundred of crawler legs


Close head shot of Asia giant millipede


Asia giant millipede curled

Archispirostreptus gigas, the giant African millipede, is one of the largest of the millipedes, growing up to 11 in (28 cm) in length. It lives in tropical and subtropical Africa, in rotting plant life or moist earth, and usually avoids light. It is black in colour, and is often kept as a pet (would you?).

Millipedes (Class Diplopoda, previously also known as Chilognatha) are arthropods that have two pairs of legs per segment (except for the first segment behind the head which does not have any appendages at all, and the next few which only have one pair of legs). Each segment that has two pairs of legs is a result of two single segments fused together as one.

Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical bodies, although some are flattened dorso-ventrally, while pill millipedes are shorter and can roll into a ball, like a pillbug. Millipedes are detritivores and slow moving. Most millipedes eat decaying leaves and other dead plant matter, moisturising the food with secretions and then scraping it in with the jaws.

Millipedes do not actually have a thousand legs - they usually have between 100-400 (2 sets of legs per body segment). Each time they molt, they add more segments and therefore more legs. Male millipedes have specialized legs used for fertilization on the seventh body segment called gonopods.

Related posts:
* Flat-back Tractor Millipede - Polydesmid

Lemon flower photo

This post is about some close up photo shot of lemon flower. Lemon fruit is the common name for (Citrus limon). The reproductive tissue surrounds the seed of the angiosperm lemon tree. The lemon is used for culinary and nonculinary purposes throughout the world. The fruit is used primarily for its juice, though the pulp and rind (zest) are also used, primarily in cooking and baking. Lemon juice is about 5% (approximately 0.03 moles/Liter) citric acid, which gives lemons a tart taste, and a pH of 2 to 3. This makes lemon juice an inexpensive, readily available acid for use in educational science experiments.


Purplish lemon flower


Lemon flower bud blooming with white petals.

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Moth on a Ginger Flower

A shot on a moth perched on petals of a ginger flower called Zingiberaceae.



Etlingera elatior (Zingiberaceae) or bunga kantan which is locally used to spice up curries, salad and laksa fish soup.

Sunday, October 5, 2008

Red Spotted Weevil - Series #3

This is the third series on red spotted weevil or a leave beetle (Chrysomelidae).


Red Spotted Weevil on a leave


Red Spotted Weevil on a grass blade


Red Spotted Weevil perched on my left thumb


Red Spotted Weevil on a balancing act

YouTube Red Spotted Weevil

Weevil Colony

Related posts:
*Red Weevil-like Insect - Series #1
* Tropical weevil - Leave bettle (Chrysomelidae) - Series #2

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Friday, October 3, 2008

Ixora Petal And Water Droplets

These photos are macro shot of Ixora coccinea's petal with tiny water droplets (from morning dew).

Ixora is also known as the Jungle Geranium, Flame of the Woods, and Jungle Flame.


Red Ixora petal with water droplets


Red Ixora petal with water droplets - part 2


X marked the spot. Red Ixora petal with water droplets - part 3

Related posts:
* Ixora coccinea flower, Flame of the Woods, Jungle Flame
* Black butterfly, Yellow Ixora

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Wild Sex - Leave Beetle Mating

Another photo series on wild sex (or insect pornography). These are photo of flea beetles or leave beetles. Watch out for the couple circle in red. It was quite a challenging shot due to the fact that the beetle couple keep on moving !


Leave beetle couple


Closer shot: Leave beetle mating


Leave beetle mating


Zero macro: Leave beetle mating silhouette

Related insect-porn posts:
* Wild Sex - Photo Of Mating Green Bugs
* Wild sex - Mating moths photo
* Wild weevil sex
* Green tropical bugs mating
* Housefly Sex, Series #2
* Adventure of two flies (Fi and Fo)